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, a new book looks at his little known legacy as a ground- breaking foreign-policy president. >> lincoln had to deal with a series of crises over the course of his presidency from france, from britain, from spain, even russian ships showed up off the atlantic coast. >> ifill: those are just some of the stories we're covering on tonight's "pbs newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: israel has launched new air strikes into syria. u.s. security officials say the attack came after nightfall, in the syrian port city of latakia after nightfall. the target was said to be russian-made, surface-to-ai
and probably don't like his anti-russian foreign policy. >> they were looking for a change, but we do have a new man looking to pursue close ties with russia and the west. do you think that dual course is possible? >> well, i think that mikheil saakashvili will have to choose. he may not be loyal to rushe splittic -- russia politically. he'll continue his own foreign policy. he's been manoeuvring between russia and the west. if he's serious about joining the european union, they will require him to worsen relations with russia. that happened with ukraine. i don't see how it will be avoided by georgia. >> you think he'll have to choose, he can't pursue both tracks? >> if the foreign policy of the european union changes, and sees russia as a threat tore competitor, it will be a very happy one for everyone, because then georgia will be able to develop close ties with russia and the rest of europe. right now the stans of the european union is anti-rush j. and the media. >> what overtures will russia make to the new leadership to try to improve ties? >> already tourism started between russia an
. you are going to take over american foreign policy. you have to think about that. to follow theu three great experts. i hope you will do it more regularly. i am really grateful to three ambassadors coming here and sharing their view with you guys. i learned a lot today. i hope you too. thank you very much. [applause] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> on the next washington journal, a look ahead at the upcoming week on capitol hill including the budget conferees meeting, the farm bill and testimony by hhs secretary sebelius. followed by a discussion on the government's efforts to fix the health care law's website. then, the earned income tax credit. how it works and who is eligible for refunds. journal live every morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. monday on the c-span networks, the mortgage bankers association will hold its annual convention in washington dc focusing on the future of the housing market. donovan, include shaun richard cordray and edward demarco among others. the jack kemp foundation wi
frank discussions. mark, you and i have covered foreign policy a long time. this is a very unhappy group of people. to a certain extent there's spying everywhere. we know that. it's a little shock. there's gambling at mr. rick's. the germans want the same special relationship of no spying agreement that we have with the uk. at the same time, i think there really is anger about they said the flash point was merkel's cell phone. >> yeah, i think that's right, andrea. it's not just anger but embarrassment on their part. remember, the first allegations of potential nsa surveillance in europe came up during the summer. at the time the germans were among those saying we understand it. we think as a dispute it's ebbing away. our concerns have been more or less met. i think there's now a feeling they climbed down and didn't make a huge case out of it in the summer only to find out it was more persuasive, lasted longer and involved the top official and their government. so they have a lot of egg on their own face. what was interesting about the long article der spiegel published over the weekend,
of how american foreign policy should work. >> when was john foster dulles secretary of state? >> both of them came to power at the same time. they were sworn in immediately after president eisenhower took office in 1953. it was the only time in american history that siblings had controlled the overt and covert sides of foreign policy. >> you have a second part of your book about six monsters. i have the pictures here. the first one is mossadegh. if i could get a brief synopsis about who they are. in 1821, john quincy adams made a famous speech on the fourth of july. he said, america does not go abroad in search of monsters to destroy. but the dulles brothers did. they were carrying out a secret world war even at a time when we thought we were at peace. they went after six monsters, six figures that they found evil in the world. minister was prime mossadegh of iran who they overthrew that your. the next year, they overthrew president arbenz in guatemala. the next year, they launched an operation against ho chi minh. was failed miserably and the operation that dragged the united states
their positions, foreign policy. russian foreign policy, policy toward the united states from ssian ambassador himself and -- i don't need to introduce them. everybody knows. ambassador pickering and pfifer.or we will try to make this as informal as possible. which makes sense. we'll have like five or seven minutes for each of you to speak, and then if you want to ask questions, i'm sure you have asked questions of each other many, many times in your life, but now you can do it with microphones. we have two microphones here in the room. if you want to ask a question, have you to come to those microphones for your questions. it will be recorded by six men. so adjust your seats. if you would like to ask a question, i suggest you move now closer to the microphone, otherwise you have to go past so many people and wait in line for the microphone. what about russian-u.s. relations? in ink we all enjoy drama the u.s.-russian relations. you need the drama. when there is no drama, we try to find one. it is like an interesting ong-time game to play. if you look at the reality, what's going on between tw
of the region, the last measure of american foreign policy should be how it is received by the house. if there were a price for most irresponsible foreign policy, it would be surely be awarded to saudi arabia. it is the nation most responsible for the rise of islamic radicalism and militancy across the world. over the past four decades, the kingdoms immense oil wealth has been used to underwrite the export of an extreme intolerant and violent version of islam. go anywhere in the world from germany to indonesia and you will find islamic centers flush with saudi money spouting intolerance and hate. a top treasury official said -- >> if i could snap my fingers and cut off funding from one country, it would be saudi arabia. >> hillary clinton confirmed that saudi arabia remained a critical financial base for terrorism. she also said that there was only limited action to stop flow of funds from taliban and other such terrorists groups. saudi arabia was one of three countries in the world to recognize and support the taliban-led government in afghanistan until the 9/11 attacks. it is also
. >> essentially it comes down to two facts about u.s. foreign policy in the middle east - one, the u.s. is committed to maintaining the peace treaty between egypt and israel. it cannot end a relationship with egypt in order to maintain the peace treaty. that is where you see some of the material, some of the military parts that are being given to the military to help preserve the security in the sinai peninsula. there's the matter of enhancing the u.s.'s stature across the great e-middle east. it would -- greater middle east. it would not do for the barack obama situation to cut off all ties with a country with whom it has had a longstanding political relationship. one of points that john kerry is making whilst in cairo is that the interim government, backed by the military, can't exist inperpetuaty, it needs to get on with establishing elections for a democratic-elected parliament and needs to take the steps sooner rather than later. >> let's talk about the visit to cairo. we didn't know about it until he landed, which makes you think iraq, afghanistan - dangerous places. what are t
outer liberal economic policies and probably they don't like he is anti-russian foreign policy and at a certain moment he will have to choose because, yes, he made the capitol in russia but he will continue his own foreign policy and so far he has been maneuvering between russia and the west. but if he is serious about joining the european union or having associate membership, the union will require him to worsen relations with russia and that happened to ukraine and not avoided by georgia. >> in the uk the defunct news of the world newspaper rebecca brooks and kandi corazon are in court to stand trial on phone hacking charges so let's go to roy who is outside of the court in london and tell us what is going to happen, roary. >> reporter: david, this starts with a bang on the first day is mostly procedural so we are likely to see the swearing in of the jury and we will get an outline really of how the trial is going to proceed. we won't actually have much of the nitty gritty of the trial or evidence or anything like that on the first day. we will see the defendants in court. 8
hatred and extremism throughout the region. but foreign policy is not a zero-sum game. if we can find ways to resolve disputes peacefully, we are wise to explore them. engagement is not appeasement, nor is it containment. we know what those are, we know where they lead, and we will not pursue them. and president obama has repeatedly made clear that words are not enough. action must match words. we understand why this is so important to so many people. because we've all been to yad vashem. earlier this year, i had the opportunity to revisit yad vashem. i had been there before, but this time was special for, because i brought my son, ziller, with me. i wanted him to see the harsh realities of the depths of evil, and the beautiful tribute to the victims of the past. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] ways demand commitment, sacrifice, and courage. tolerance, equality, and justice around the globe. and it demands that we remember the timeless questions of rabbi hillel, "if i am not for myself, who will be for me
friendship ith other countries. if you follow iraq's foreign policy, you would see that the iraqis think independently and not according to the interest of any others. we have a partnership an agreement with the united states. this is something some other countries do not like. that we like it, this is what matters. be believed to have a strong relation within the united states. if others do not agree, it is their problem. they cannot impose anything on the iraqis. if they want to be our friends our friendship does not impose on us being enemies of others. >> how do you respond to critics -- this is not coming from me, but a question from someone else -- say you are consolidating power and this has adversely affected iraq's democratic process? >> the constitution and ruling in iraq gives prerogative. this is something i state clearly. let me know when i act in an unconstitutional way. if i act in a way that is not acceptable to some of our partners, as long as i am committing to respecting the constitution and as long as i use my prerogative in a constitutional way, there should ot be a
hands on with foreign policy. >> you tell me the president has been hands on with health care and let this roll out. 2 million people have lost their health care policy and you say he's done it well? >> he's done it terribly. i say name another instance. i've been all day talking to techies about my own web site. they have language i don't even understand. this is incredibly complicated thing to do. i agree with you. there's no excuse for the way it's been run out. but i also don't agree with you with the immense complexity of what they're trying to do and the difficulty of it. medicare d had the same problems from the beginning. >> andrew, you can't on the one hand say that he is detail oriented and hands on and then he not know so many things about benghazi, not know what happened regarding the irs, not be knowledgeable what's going on with the nsa. >> he did not know. >> when you can't be detail oriented and not know. >> if he'd known about the irs, we should be imbeaching the guy. he was not using the irs. >> tell us how hand on he is when his problem is mushrooming inside his own
states to our conduct of foreign policy, to the defense matters, to economic matters. and i'm a strong supporter of it. >> do you think the snowden leaks have hurt america's ability to defend itself? >> i do. i think he's a traitor. i hope we can catch him at some point and that he receives the justice he deserves. >> and the full interview with dick cheney going to air this afternoon on the lead with jake tapper at 4:00 p.m. eastern. you're not going to want to miss that. also want to bring in christiane amanpour in the london news room talking about the nsa, the spying, of course, the aftermath of the allies really upset about this. one thing you said earlier today that really struck us here is that you said there was a deficit of good will among u.s. allies. and that's part of the reason why they are so so frustrated and angry right now. why is there a deficit of good will among our allies? >> well, it's interesting you just played that clip of former vice president cheney. let's go back to the cheney/bush years which april pex was all the angst and anger over the unite at the iraq
security adviser reordered priorities on foreign policy and this is all part of that. explain what you think it happening and how it's perceived overseas. >> the administration is stating a new approach to the region in which they are being pretty explicit about u.s. difficulty in determining the outcome of what they view the civil war in syria, rather than try to pretend they can shape it decisively. pulling back from that. described the approach generally as one of strategic humility recognizing there are limits to american power as we certainly saw it in the iraq war and afghanistan. i think what's bothering the people, the situation in syria is so violent, the loss of life so great, it's going to get worse this winter. we're going to have tens of thousands of people suffering in the cold and dying i fear. it's understandable that members of congress are upset. i haven't heard anybody, including the angry senators, propose a strategy that's much more coherent than what the administration is putting out. >> you were the first to report on how angry the saudis are, angry about the pre
mccain and senator gram are just on a warpath in general about the obama administration foreign policy in the middle east arguing it is failing .. in many dimensions. i think there are so many elements that they oppose, the one i would focus on for your viewers is, i think the job that they have done communicating with even traditional and close friends and allies, the uae, jordan would be two obvious examples, has not been what you would expect or indeed what the u.s. needs right now. this period of change in the region you have got to really stand close to all the people who matter in terms of the execution of foreign policy. >> rose:. >> maliki is not only a tyrant but from the beginning he is sectarian to the core, and that means this shiite divide and he has taken the war to the sunni minority in iraq and i think in a way has done sort of iran's bidding in that way but i think even if you set the war in syria aside, he would have an enormous problem on his hands because, on his hands because he has not -- he has not tried to be inclusive in the way that he has governed iraq, and
. let's close with free trade. you're on the board of an organization called just foreign policy, and that organization is offering a reward to anyone who can give it a copy of the negotiating text of the trans-pacific partnership agreement. any takers so far? >> not so far. so the idea here is that we do have people involved in negotiating process, they have access to at least parts of the deal. so the hope is that someone from good conscience, presumably more than, you know, the hope of getting a big reward, will feel, you know, feel the urge to make it public and, you know, the organization just foreign policy -- i'm on the board, but i don't play an active role in running it -- will be happy to then post on the web so that, you know, people across the country can really, you know, in all the countries will have an opportunity to see it. >> so in the last word here, both of you, the argument is this trans-pacific partnership agreement will ensure a freer flow of goods and greater prosperity. the other side of it really serves essentially what we know about it, the corporate in
intentions, what they call leadership intentions, foreign policy objectives, human rights and then threats of the financial system. i find the last one to the financial system. what threats to the financial system does the vatican pose? >> that's a bit of a head scratcher because it doesn't have a particularly large amount of economic clout. occasionally they make comments about policy suggestion for how to help the world economy and how to help the world develop particularly in the developing world but it doesn't wield a lot of financial power. it isn't that big financially. it does have an institute. now, there's the institute for the works of religion which is kind of a bank that's set up to help coordinate charitable activities and currently the pope -- both pope francis and pope benedict had been working to kind of clean up some of the activity and put the vatican bank in a more rigorous footing. but it's a small bank in the scale of things. and so i don't really know what kind of threats they would imagine the holy sea would pose. >> it's very, very interesting i appreciate you givin
. lou: always good to talk with you. come back soon. much more on the president's foreign policy and its failures with the "a-team" next. stay with us. who is responsible for the obamacare mess? should obamacare be fixed or just scrub? for health and human services secretary michael leavitt joins us next. ♪ as a business owner, i'm constantly putting out fires. so i deserve a small business credit card with amazing rewards. with the spark cascard from capital one, i get 2% cash back on ery purchase, every day. i break my back around here. finally soone's recognizing me with unlimited rewards! meetings start at 11, cindy. [ male announcer get the spark business card from capital one. choose 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every d. what's in your wallet? i need your timesheets, larry! what's in your wallet? at od, whatever business you're in, that's the business we're in with premium service like one of the best on-time delivery records and a low claims ratio, we do whatever it takes to make your business our business. od. helping the world keep promises. lou: an explosiv
. lou: always good to talk with you. come bac soon. much more on the president's foreign policy and its failures with the "a-team" next. stay with us. who is responsible for the obamacare mess? should obamacare be fixed or just scrub? for health and human services secretary michael leavitt joins us next. ♪ lou: an explosive new book entitled double down focusing on potential 2016 candidates and according to authors, mitt romney's decided he could not choose new dirt -- new jersey's governor as running mate because his background was littered with land mines. allegedly had unanswered questions concerning a defamation lawsuit, his medical history, and this time as a securities industry lobbyist. another major revelation in the book, the president's top aides secretly considering replacing vice president biden on the 2012 ticket with then secretary of state hillary clinton. the last time the federal government delivered a new health care benefit to more than 40 billion people, our next guest was in charge, health and human services secretary when the bush administration unveiled medicare
, he has been a leader and virtually every foreign- policy issue for the united states over the past three decades. this year, he became the first sitting chairman of that committee in over a century to become secretary of state. two weeks ago, i was honored to travel to asia with secretary kerry where you push key initiatives like the trans- pacific partnership. he has knowledge and global reach in this leadership position. ladies and gentlemen, let's give a warm welcome to a national hero, a man who he would dedicate his life to serve the united states in a tireless and can do way and is dealing with the tough issues that face our world. please help me welcome my friend secretary of state, john kerry. [applause] >> good morning. thank you. thank you very much. thank you for an extraordinary introduction. based on the introduction, i accept the nomination. [laughter] only kidding. i'm out of that now. i tell you, a couple of months before i was out of the job of being secretary stay, i'm still serving and the u.s. senate. i was walking through the airport one day and you notice when
on the president's foreign policy, failures we take up with the a-team, stay with us, much more ahead. >> laughingstock. that is what leading republican senator john boa boar aso calls kathleen sebelius, he is next. so ally bank has a raise your rate cd that wothat's correct.a rate. cause i'm really nervous about getting trapped. why's that? uh, mark? go get help! i have my reasons. look, you don't have to feel trapped with our raise your rate cd. if our rate on this cd goes up, yours can too. oh that sounds nice. don't feel trapped with the ally raise your rate cd. ally bank. your money needs an ally. lou: a third gun manufacturing company has announced it is leaving the state of new york over governor andrew cuomo's sweeping new anti-gun laws. american tactical imports, the name of the firm is moving to south carolina taking a reported to have million dollars in recesses with it, one of the nation's oldest and largest gun manufacturers. it may be arriving in some form. a team of computer experts is being brought in to help the obama administration determine whether there is of fakes
views, thank you. >> thank you. lou: much more on the president's foreign policy, failures we take up with the a-team, stay with us, much more ahead. >> laughingstock. that is what leading republican senator john boa boar aso calls kathleen sebelius, he is next. so i can reach ally bank 24/7, but there are no branches? 24/7. i'm sorry, i'm just really reluctant to try new things. really? what's wrong with trying new things? look! mommy's new vacuum! (cat screech) you feel that in your muscles? i do... drink water. it's a long story. well, not having branches let's us give you great rates and service. i'd like that. a new way to bank. a better way to save. ally bank. your money needs an ally. once wrote something on a sheet of paper and placed it in his factory for all to see. ♪ four simple words where the meaning has never been lost. the challenge always accepted. and the calling forever answered. ♪ introducing the all-new 2014 s-class. mercedes-benz. the best or nothing. lou: a third gun manufacturing company has announced it is leaving the state of new york over governor andrew
allegations threaten to disrupt foreign policy with u.s. allies. >> i think the revelations from snowden and the secrets revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, with mexico, with the other countries to where the suggestion is that we've listened in. i think we have repair work to do and hard questions to ask of the n.s.a. about what's really happening in this program. >> congressman peter king, the chairman of the house homeland security committee said america should stop apologizing. >> the reality is the n.s.a. has saved thousands of lives in the united states, france and germany and throughout europe. the french is someone to talk. they have carried out spying operations against the united states, both the government and industry. as far as germany, that's where the hamburg blot began which started 9/11. the french and germans and other european countries, we are not doing this for the fun of it. >> former vice president dick cheney agrees the u.s. should remain cautious. >> the overall capabilities are important and need to be preserved. >>
it was a foreign policy question. when reagan was running against ford in the primaries, reagan had in the speeches time and time again reference to the panama canlt. it did not resonate until one night in florida it blew the roof off to the place he was speaking. reagan never lost his place was stimmied. he didn't expect the places -- applause there. it it had do with the complication of foreign policy at the time mo -- if you had to have a book shelf of explanations what you're doing is right or wrong. just oppose it. it may be wrong and current productive. if works because of what you talked about and works in a political sense because it's a populous appeal to the frustrations who has every right to be frustrated and every right to be upset about the way things are in washington. what is the response to the tea party? you have 18 poem -- people in washington saying what is their plan? it's not the job of the american people to come up with a plan. it's a job to say we don't like it or we do. we hired you guys to come up with a plan and implement it. now you do it. that's not the way the reelect
is the embargo still in place? >> well, it's hard to think about more counter productive foreign policy than the u.s. embargo. here we have 180 plus nations in the united nations voting against a country who's supposedly the beacon of liberty around the world in favor of a ruthless brutal dictatorship because of the the embargo. i cannot think of a policy that has served the opposite purpose of the goal towards cuba. i mean, after 50 years of the embargo in place, cuba is not any closer to becoming a democracy than in 1960, so i think it's pretty clear that it is an utter failure. >> this is the 22nd year in a row the u.n. voted on this issue. last year, three voted in favor of the sufficient, this year only two, israel being the second. is the u.s. growing more and more isolated on this issue and what does it signal? >> the tiny island of paolo was the other country that voted last year in favor of the united states. i think the embargo is quite the useful tool for the cuban regime. look at what's going on. it helps the cuban regime to rally the entire world behind them and against the unit
. and finally, turn to what is the -- what do the implications of this an how we implement foreign policy. with that sort of an overarching on the topic i like to see us cover. i'm going it start with the first question on the threat we face and why we need -- feel we need security. if there are no benefits with e wouldn't have be having the discussion. with that, george, i would like to turn to you. how has the threat of terrorism changed over the past decade and how have our security and -- it's changed, henry, i think a few relatively significant ways. first, it is a threat than it was ten to fifteen years ago. it's not necessarily aligned bay group by ideology and other driving factors which may be complaint about how we are conducting ourselves in their view. secondly, the threat seems to progress at time very rapidly. what may appear to be a localized threat today perhaps in some obscure part of the world could in fact be on the doorstep tomorrow. lastly, it has significantly. they don't necessarily appear based on their actions and recent actions are indicators of that. that necess
strategy in the iranian foreign policy. the essential question is did sanctions work? >> it's difficult to come up with an explanation as to why it is in the presidential elections six of the seven candidates criticized the previous negotiator. unless there was some impact sanctions were having on the debate in iran. it's difficult to see why it is his focus on the economy would have been so successful unless the sanctions were having some impact in iran's economy. it's difficult to see why it is that after several years which iran seemed entirely uninterested in a nuclear deal we have a new nuclear negotiating team that is obviously interested in reaching a deal as quickly as possible. unless the sanctions were having some impact on iran. and i think one of the people whose opinion we should listen to in the matter is mr. -- who said repeatedly the sanction we're having a dramatic impact on iran. and it change and approach was necessary. so from the perspective of the obama administration, -- as i have written several monograph. the obama team from the beginning always thought the sanc
, you would probably be upset, you could understand it at some level because spying is part of foreign policy, but you are a human being and you would be ticked off and she is. >> united states is not the only country that spies on world leaders. madeline albright said that once she was at the united nations and said. >> rick: a french are ambassador asked her about something she said on a phone call. this is not unusual that people spy. >> a group of soldiers in mosl, injured more than 150, it raises this month's death toll to 545 people killed. a surge in sectarian violence has killed more than 500,000 people around iraq. >>> in line with agreement to eliminate all of the weapons by mid 2014. al jazeera's kimberly dukehart has more. >>> syria is meeting an ambitious deadline set by opcew to destroy its lethal stockpile by next year. syria handed over the detail thursday ahead of its october 27th deadline. opcw is not releasing what their report says but it did say the syrian government disclosed 23 chemical weapon sights, the head said last week that the country has so far been coo
, american foreign policy towards syria. the meeting, the deputy prime minister re-engagement with elements of the assad regime and shows americans deep involved and engagement in pushing for a political settlement inside syria. interesting developments there. i want to move on and talk about the meeting between peace envoy lakhdar brahimi, who was expected to hold talks with president assad. lakhdar brahimi says he has seen assad playing a role in a new syria, but not as a leader. do you think this is something assad is likely to agree to? >> not at all. in fact, not only assad would not agree to what mr lakhdar brahimi publicly stated, lakhdar brahimi yesterday tried to distance himself from his own announcement on syrian television, saying the statement was taken out of context. president assad warned lakhdar brahimi to stay faithful to his mission, not to make any statements outside of his mission. the reality is that there is a stalemate in the syrian crisis. the reality is the syrian opposition is divided. the assad regime is not going to make a compromise or really give the oppositio
. if you follow iraq's foreign policy you would see iraq is acting independently and freely according to its own interest and not according to the interest of any other country. we have a partnership and agreement with the united states but this is something some countries do not like but we like it because we believe nits our interest to have relationship with the united states. if others do not agree that's their problem. they cannot impose anything on iraqis. if they want to be our friend. our friendship does not impose on us being enmies of others. >> how do you respond to critics -- this is a question asked by somebody else -- who say you are consolidating power around you and this has adversely affected iraq's democratic process? >> the constitution is in iraq. it gives peroggatives and i state let me know when i act in an unconstitutional way. if i act in a way that is not accept to believe some of our partners this is something else. as long as i'm committed to respecting the constitution and as long as i use my prerogatives in a constitutional way there shouldn't be a problem
are the implications of this on how we implement foreign policy. it serves as an overarching of the things i would like to see us cover. i would like to start with the first question on the rent we face and why we need security. if there are no benefits, we do not need security. how has the threat of terrorism changed over the past decade and how have our methods adaptive? >> it has changed in relatively significant ways. it is a far more diffuse threat than it was 10 or 15 years ago. it is not necessarily align to buy group, but principally by ideology and other driving fact there's, -- driving factors. secondly, the threat seems to progress at times very rapidly. what may appear to be a localized threat today could be on our doorstep tomorrow. lastly, they do not necessarily appear based on their actions in recent actions are indicators of that. big and complex attacks are their goal or their aim to accomplish their objectives. relatively small in comparison attacks that are relatively simple to put together and execute seem to be a preference. they have the same tools we all have to communicate in a
on people relying on the new health care system. >>> plus, a tough week for the president's foreign policy. new revelations about u.s. spying on allies, including the bugging of the german chancellor's phone. undermines critical relationships at a sensitive time. >>> and does the mideast trust this president? the fallout between syria and iran. the conflicts of global influences ahead. our roundtable is talking about politics and parenting this week after maryland's attorney general is spotted at a beach party where mine oors are drink. and nbc's brian williams reflects on hurricane sandy, one year ago. the wounds that haven't healed on the jersey shore are personal to him. all of that is ahead on "meet the press" on sunday, october 27. >>> from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning to you. obama care fix is on, but will it work? here are some of the latest developments. the end of november is the timeline the administration is now targeting to have the obama care website running smoothly. the latest re
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 90 (some duplicates have been removed)